Clementine Cake – a Dairy and Wheat Free Seasonal Delight!

_MG_9007

Turn a few ingredients into a simple and delicious cake or dessert.

I included a version of this recipe in my first book, Focus on Flavour. It is a great way of using eggs and at this time of year, when there is an abundance of clementines (or satsumas or tangerines), it makes a great treat, with the added bonus of having no flour or added fat and being relatively low in sugar. So it is excellent for anyone looking for a wheat / gluten and dairy free cake or dessert.

I first heard of this from Claudia Roden and later came across it on Nigella.com.

I have reduced the sugar significantly, it really does not need to be particularly sweet, let the flavour and sweetness of the fruit shine through!

_MG_9021 If you cut the cake into 12 slices, it comes to less than 180 calories a piece.  We will have it with some lovely thick greek yogurt, or a scoop of chocolate sorbet, as a dessert. A small sliver would go very well with a cup of espresso if you have guests to please….

I plan to freeze half of it.

Clementine Cake
Serves 12
A moist and fruity gluten- and dairy-free cake or dessert, making the most of seasonal clementines and eggs, with ground almonds for body.
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Prep Time
2 hr 15 min
Cook Time
1 hr
Total Time
3 hr 15 min
Prep Time
2 hr 15 min
Cook Time
1 hr
Total Time
3 hr 15 min
181 calories
13 g
93 g
12 g
7 g
2 g
85 g
38 g
8 g
0 g
10 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
85g
Servings
12
Amount Per Serving
Calories 181
Calories from Fat 104
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 12g
19%
Saturated Fat 2g
8%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 3g
Monounsaturated Fat 7g
Cholesterol 93mg
31%
Sodium 38mg
2%
Total Carbohydrates 13g
4%
Dietary Fiber 3g
11%
Sugars 8g
Protein 7g
Vitamin A
3%
Vitamin C
30%
Calcium
10%
Iron
7%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 6 clementines (or satsumas or tangerines, use 8 if small - about 440g in total)
  2. 225g ground almonds
  3. 50g soft brown sugar
  4. 6 eggs
  5. 1 tsp baking powder (heaped)
Instructions
  1. Put fruit in pan, cover with cold water, bring to the boil, cover and simmer 2 hours.
  2. Drain and cool.
  3. Preheat the oven to 180C.
  4. Cut the fruit in half, discarding the seeds and stalks.
  5. Blitz (skins and all) in a food processor.
  6. Add the other ingredients and pulse until integrated.
  7. Pour into a greased, lined, loose-bottomed 20cm cake tin.
  8. Bake for 1 hour, covering with paper after 40 minutes to prevent browning too much.
  9. A skewer should come out clean when the cake is cooked.
  10. Cool in the tin on a wire rack.
  11. Turn out and sprinkle with icing sugar.
  12. Serve with dairy free chocolate sorbet or sauce for a luscious dessert, or with a dollop pf thick greek yogurt if dairy is ok.
Notes
  1. Although this requires a long time for the fruit to soften, they don't need to be closely watched and that can be done the evening before if you wish. Actually making the cake takes hardly any time or effort at all!
Adapted from Claudia Roden
beta
calories
181
fat
12g
protein
7g
carbs
13g
more
Adapted from Claudia Roden
Focus on Flavour http://www.focusonflavour.com/

Best possible start to your 5:2 journey….

Thousands of people like me have successfully taken up 5:2 Intermittent Fasting and succeeded in reaching a healthy weight, improving their health and reducing their risk of life shortening diseases.

But what if you are a little intimidated by the idea and not sure how best to get started?

Unlike other weight loss and diet programs, up to now 5:2 has been very much a thing for self-starters and there are a various websites, blogs, Facebook groups and forums where those following this way of eating have been discussing it and sharing their hints and tips. There is a lot of information and support, but it can be bewildering and confusing, especially if you are not accustomed to using social media.

Maybe you haven’t started yet or are ready to re-start after a lapse?

Now the people over at the FastDay forum have launched an exciting new online program designed to give you the best possible start and give you the resources that you need to help you succeed.

FastStart Program6 week FastStart program, beginning on January 15th

I observed the trial that was run before Christmas and was very impressed by the well-organised material and the resources made available to the participants.

If you would like to know more, pop on over to the FastDay site and visit The FastStart Program where you can read about it and reserve a place.

Tangle Pie – a lighter way to top almost anything!

Tangle PieThis idea came to me via the Hairy Dieters, whose recipes are enormously popular with many 5:2 fasters, as they are generally straightforward and family friendly.  I am a great fan of filo pastry, as one of the things you often miss when you cut back on starchy carbs and fat (i.e pastry) is a contrasting texture. Here is a way of adding something light and crispy as a topping.  In this example, I was actually using more of my Christmas leftovers so this is a Turkey Tangle Pie, which also used up the last scraps of gammon, some mushrooms, some cream and some brandy. I’m going to be trying some variations of this for sure – imagine some roasted veg and a rich mushroom and sherry sauce, or layers of sliced celeriac and carrots with spinach and a herby sauce…. or something fruity like apples, mincemeat and marzipan with just a drizzle of honey or maple syrup or a sprinkle of icing sugar when serving…

So to the method: 

  • One sheet* of filo pastry per portion and half a teaspoon of vegetable oil, I used sunflower oil.
  • Lay the sheets on top of each other and cut into 3. Lay those on top of each other, and then cut into 3 in the other direction, so you end up with 9 small rectangles from each slice.
  • Now, scrunch them up and lay them on top of your pie to cover the filling completely and very lightly brush with the oil.
  • Bake in a hot oven for 15 – 20 minutes.

* I have discovered that filo sheets vary a lot in size! The ones I use measure 30 x 38cms, there are 8 -10 sheets in a 250g pack, so each sheet would be between 70 and 90 calories. ½ a teaspoon of oil is about 20 calories. So adding a topping like this will be add approximately 100 calories per serving. Compare that to a puff pastry topping, which would be about 300 calories!

Christmas Leftovers? Squash, Stilton and Quince Tart – 410 calories a portion

Continuing my theme of working through the Christmas Leftovers…. I had one of those serendipitous moments when I picked up a cookbook (Ottolenghi’s Plenty More, a welcome Christmas gift), opened a page at random and realised that I had all the ingredients that I needed. Of course I couldn’t resist making some little changes… a little less oil, a little less richness by reducing the cream and quantity of cheese. So his Membrillo and Stilton Quiche has become Squash, Stilton and Quince Tart  (too many Ss and Qs to leave it called Quiche…).

Squash, Stilton and Quince Tart

Continuing with my current passion for making my own pastry, I rustled up some light and crumbly shortcrust – but you can use ready made and it will still taste good.

I used butternut squash, which has been waiting for me to find an inspiring recipe, but you could use any kind of pumpkin or winter squash. I may try something similar with other vegetables like beetroot. In fact, the idea of a roasted vegetable and blue cheese crustless quiche has me rather excited now…

If you have a chunk of Stilton left, that is perfect for this. Actually I was surprised at how mellow it became after cooking, perhaps because I am more accustomed to using Roquefort as a blue cheese, which is indeed a good deal more tangy. That or any strong blue cheese would make acceptable alternatives.

Perhaps you are lucky enough to have your own Quinces and have made yourself some Quince Paste or Jelly or Cheese, or have been given some for Christmas? I find it keeps well for months in the fridge, but it also freezes well. You may find it in the Spanish section of a store as Membrillo, or in French it is called Pate de Coing. If you don’t have any you could perhaps substitute some other thick fruit jelly or I thought of using some chunks of stoned dates. Failing that, some chunks of peeled pear could be an interesting match, but the sticky sweetness of the quince paste does work beautifully.

Spinach, Fennel and Pomegranate Salad

I served it with a lively ‘tricolour’ salad of young Spinach leaves with finely shredded Fennel and topped with Pomegranate Seeds, drizzled with a balsamic vinaigrette. 

Absolutely delicious seasonal fare. Each serving only 410 calories for the tart and 72 for the salad, so this could even be a meal on a fast day.

Squash, Stilton and Quince Tart with Spinach, Fennel and Pomegranate Salad

So with thanks to Ottolenghi, here is my version of Squash, Stilton and Quince Quiche:-

Squash, Stilton and Quince Tart
Serves 6
A luscious mixture of mellow blue cheese and sumptuous quince jelly adorns the golden cubes of squash in this festive season tart.
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Prep Time
1 hr
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
1 hr 40 min
Prep Time
1 hr
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
1 hr 40 min
395 calories
37 g
139 g
22 g
13 g
12 g
226 g
587 g
4 g
0 g
8 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
226g
Servings
6
Amount Per Serving
Calories 395
Calories from Fat 194
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 22g
34%
Saturated Fat 12g
60%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 7g
Cholesterol 139mg
46%
Sodium 587mg
24%
Total Carbohydrates 37g
12%
Dietary Fiber 3g
11%
Sugars 4g
Protein 13g
Vitamin A
190%
Vitamin C
32%
Calcium
23%
Iron
9%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1 tbsp olive oil
  2. 500g butternut squash or pumpkin, peeled and deseeded
For the pastry
  1. 150g plain flour
  2. 75g unsalted butter
  3. ½ tsp salt
  4. extra flour for rolling out
For the filling
  1. 125g Blue Stilton Blue Cheese, crumbled
  2. 50g Quince Paste (or Membrillo), cut into small cubes
  3. 125ml Creme Fraiche
  4. 125ml milk
  5. 3 eggs
  6. sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 200c (fan).
  2. Cut the squash into smallish cubes, about 2cm, spread on a baking tray and toss in the olive oil.
  3. Bake in the oven for about 30 minutes, turning half way, until soft and starting to brown at the edges, then leave aside to cool.
  4. Meanwhile, make the pastry.
  5. Chop the butter into the flour and salt and then rub together until like breadcrumbs.
  6. Add enough cold water to just form a dough.
  7. Roll out thinly in a floured surface and transfer to a lightly greased or non stick 24cm flan dish.
  8. Leave to chill in the fridge for about 20 minutes.
  9. Turn the oven down to 180c (fan).
  10. Cover the pastry with baking parchment and beans and blind bake for about 10 minutes, then remove the paper and bake for a further 5 - 10 minutes until lightly cooked.
  11. Whisk the eggs with the cream and milk and season to taste.
  12. Distribute the squash over the pastry, then the stilton and pieces of quince jelly and pour over the egg mixture.
  13. Bake for about 40 minutes until set and golden.
  14. Serve warm.
Notes
  1. I found that 250ml of liquid and 3 eggs was a little too much for my 25cm flan dish, but I have left this quantity in case yours is a little deeper.
  2. You could add some herbs to the baking squash to vary the flavour.
  3. Try some chopped stoned dates if you don't have any quince paste.
  4. Some chopped walnuts or pine nuts would make an interesting crunchy addition.
  5. The calorie count for this recipe card is somewhat different from my own calculations. I'm not sure why!
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calories
395
fat
22g
protein
13g
carbs
37g
more
Adapted from Membrillo and Stilton Quiche by Ottolenghi
Focus on Flavour http://www.focusonflavour.com/

In praise of stock…

It’s time to deal with the remnants of the turkey. It was delicious, the best we have had in years – many thanks to Domaine du Merchien, who raised it lovingly and organically. The flavour is almost sweet – perhaps as a result of grazing on grapes….

A turkey is an expensive treat and I don’t want to waste a scrap of it. So whilst the remaining meat will be turned into Turkey, Ham and Leek Flan, Turkey and Mushroom Pie, Turkey Curry, Turkey Risotto etc, the carcass will form the basis of a stock that will be the basis of many soups to come. I have re-kindled my love of soup since we started intermittent fasting. There is nothing I like better to break my fast with than a bowl of soup. From the simplest of vegetable soups to those zingy with spices, unctuously creamy, thick with pulses or enriched with ground nuts.

Turkey Stock

Just as it is starting to bubble and come to the boil, turn it down to the lowest possible setting, then cover

So the carcass and all the scraps of skin and bits of stuffing are broken up and put in my largest saucepan. Along with a chopped carrot, some celery stalks, a couple of small onions cut in quarters, a dozen peppercorns, 2 bay leaves, a large sprig of thyme and a generous pinch of salt. Bring to the boil and immediately turn down to the lowest possible setting, cover and leave for a couple of hours. In particular, avoid boiling it or simmering too fast, as that seems to bring out a flavour of bone, rather than the rich, sweet flavour of the turkey. Then I will strain it (the veggie bits go to feed the chickens, any scraps of meat will be a treat for the pussy cats) and return the liquid to a clean pan, to boil fast and reduce to a manageable quantity. This can then be portioned up and frozen for use later. I do exactly the same sort of thing when we have a roast chicken.

We also had a small joint of smoked gammon, which I boiled and then baked in the oven. I saved the water from the boiling to use to flavour one of my all time favourite soups, Pea and Ham. Any scraps of ham will come into their own with that one. The split peas are simmering as I write….

So as we move into what may turn out to be a frugal year, I am intent on making the most of all the ingredients at my disposal to add that all important element – flavour. Scraps of vegetables and their peelings, leaves from celery, herbs and spices, bones – these can help transform a simple soup into something special. So when I can, I will – make stock!

More soup recipes to come…..

Cinnamon and Citrus Pineapple

Cinnamon and Citrus Pineapple

If you are like me you were tempted to buy a luscious pineapple for your fruit bowl, but then with all the mince pies and Christmas Pudding, it hasn’t yet been eaten. Here is a lovely way to enjoy ripe pineapple.

Serves 4

  • 1 medium pineapple 338 kcals
  • 10g unsalted butter 72 kcals
  • 120g 0% fat fromage blanc (or fromage frais) 56 kcals
  • 1 lime 20 kcals
  • 2 tsp acacia honey 40 kcals
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon 6 kcals
  • 1/2 tsp freshly grated nutmeg 6 kcals

To garnish

  • A generous pinch of ground cinnamon
  • Lime zest

Cut the top and bottom off the pineapple, stand on a board and cut away the skin.

Cut in half lengthwise and then cut each half into 4, making 8 even-sized spears.

Cut off and discard the central core from each spear.

Grate the lime zest, or remove the outer coloured layer with a peeler (avoiding the pith) and then cut into shreds, or use a zester.

Cut the lime in half and squeeze the juice.

Mix half of the cinnamon in with the fromage blanc, which you can whisk lightly to create more volume (this doesn’t work so well with fromage frais).

Mix 2 teaspoons of honey with the remaining cinnamon and grated nutmeg into the lime juice.

Melt the butter in a non-stick pan and fry the pineapple over medium heat for about 8 minutes, turning so that it is just starting to brown lightly on all sides.

Pour in the lime sauce and let it bubble for a couple of minutes, spooning it over the pineapple to give a good glazed coating.

Serve the pineapple with any remaining pan juices drizzled over and a helping of fromage frais, garnished with lime zest and a sprinkle of cinnamon.

Per serving kcals 135
Carbs 28g Fat 2g Protein 3g

Vary this by adding some finely chopped crystallised ginger in with the fromage blanc – only 31kcal for 10g.

**Do use cinnamon from Sri Lanka (Ceylon) if possible and try to avoid inferior varieties, which are usually Cinnamomum cassia from China or Indonesia, rather than Cinnamomum verum, which is considered safer to use in large quantities. Either variety may be helpful for stabilising blood sugar and lowering cholesterol.

 

Maintaining and Improving!

If a fortune teller had told me 2 years ago that I would comfortably be able to wear clothes that I had for my honeymoon in 1996, I would have said they were giving me false hope. If they had gone on to say that I would wake up in the morning looking forward to going for a 5km run* dressed in lycra, I would have said they were a charlatan, or had got me confused with someone else!

IMG_1802

But the truth of the matter is that thanks to 5:2, both of the above are true! 

I also now have blood sugar level that is normal rather than pre-diabetic, low triglycerides, improved cholesterol and healthy blood pressure. I feel more energetic and thanks to having less weight to carry around, I am lighter on my feet and have much less pain in my joints.

I have easily maintained my weight around my target of 55kg without having to count calories or even particularly to watch what I eat. However, I have found that my tastes have changed, if I don’t have fresh vegetables and fruit I miss them. I eat far less in the way of starchy carbs than I used to. I rarely think of chocolate. My portion sizes are smaller and I seldom have a second helping of anything.

I do usually continue to do 2 fast days a week unless we are away on holiday. I find that allows me to not have to worry about the other 5 days at all plus I get the long term health benefits of the two days of going for 24 hours without eating and then having just 500 calories. It’s really not an effort now and is very much a part of our life.

Being fit and healthy and able to wear what I like in my mid sixties is very enjoyable!

So, if you are contemplating following this way of eating, I would encourage you to get started – you have nothing to lose except weight and poor health!

*If you are interested in how I managed to go from being a real couch potato to someone who enjoys brisk walking and running, then I highly recommend the Couch to 5k programme – I followed the podcasts created by the NHS and they really do work. 

Love Crispy Chinese Duck? Try Crispy Chinese Pork!

Since we have been in France, one of the things we occasionally miss is going to the local Chinese restaurant for crispy duck with pancakes. I have been unable to find anywhere to buy the pancakes, though I think that doing crispy duck would be really easy, if you start with duck confit. 

But this isn’t about duck, it is about pork. Over the last year or so I have heard a lot about Pulled Pork, but had never tried it. Then last week, there was a special pork promotion on and I bought a pack of two boned and rolled pork shoulders for a bargain price. 

Chinese Pancakes with Pulled Pork Chinese Pancakes with Pulled Pork

Turning to my frequent source of good ideas and inspiration, the 5:2 Intermittent Fasting Diet Recipes from Around the World group on Facebook, I found a recommended recipe for Pulled Pork. I pretty much followed the recipe to the letter, with a little less sugar, although I was really worried that it was going to be too much smoky paprika flavour (it wasn’t).

I marinaded the pork overnight in spices. The next day I baked both the joints for 5 hours. Then I finished one of them off on the BBQ.

That first night we had it in a baguette (a treat in itself for us these days), with home made cole slaw alongside. It was really lovely. Graham said “this is very much like Crispy Duck, can we have it again but with pancakes, cucumber and spring onions?”.

So the next step was to see if I could find a good straightforward recipe for the pancakes. I had always imagined that they were made from rice flour, but no, just a very simple recipe using plain flour, water and a small amount of vegetable oil. The master stroke was in rolling two at a time, with a coating of sesame oil between them, then dry frying them as one and separating after cooking. It worked really well. A final steam for 10 minutes before serving. Here’s the recipe and method for Chinese Pancakes.

The Hoisin Sauce was based on some Black Bean and Garlic paste that needed using up (if you want to find ingredients like that in South West France, try Paris Store in Toulouse). I started with this recipe (but note I didn’t use that recipe for the pancakes and I used a lot less sugar in the sauce).

So our Saturday night Strictly supper on our laps, was Crispy Pork Pancakes. So good, we did it all again on Sunday….. :-)

Seasonal lusciousness – Walnut and Chestnut Tart, with Figs

IMG_1849

I was reminded of my alternative to Pecan Pie recently, but when I looked at the recipe I had included in my first book, Focus on Flavour, I realised that it was very calorific and much richer than we have become used to. So here is my (somewhat) reduced calorie version. It is still at least 300 calories per portion, so not something for a fast day….

I used ready rolled brisée pastry for mine, but you could use a basic shortcrust or sweet shortcrust pastry.  I have noted the ingredients in order to get the calorie count to match what the packet told me… 

Because we have so many fabulous figs in the garden this year, I have added two, which gave a really lovely flavour and texture for variety, but it would be equally good without them.  I served it with a fromage blanc and walnut ice cream. A lovely seasonal weekend treat.

Walnut and Chestnut Tart, with Figs
Serves 12
A lighter alternative to a pecan pie, using walnuts and chestnut cream
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Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
1 hr 10 min
Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
1 hr 10 min
303 calories
18 g
65 g
24 g
5 g
9 g
97 g
18 g
3 g
0 g
14 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
97g
Servings
12
Amount Per Serving
Calories 303
Calories from Fat 204
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 24g
36%
Saturated Fat 9g
44%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 9g
Monounsaturated Fat 5g
Cholesterol 65mg
22%
Sodium 18mg
1%
Total Carbohydrates 18g
6%
Dietary Fiber 2g
8%
Sugars 3g
Protein 5g
Vitamin A
9%
Vitamin C
4%
Calcium
4%
Iron
5%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
For the brisée pastry
  1. 140g flour
  2. 55g butter
  3. 6g sugar
  4. water
For the filling
  1. 70g unsalted butter
  2. 100g sweetened Chestnut Cream
  3. 125ml single cream
  4. 2 tbsp rum
  5. 2 eggs
  6. 200g walnut pieces (including 13 halves)
  7. 2 fresh figs, each cut into 6 wedges.230g brisée pastry, ready rolled
Instructions
  1. Line a 24cm flan dish with baking parchment and pastry and prick the bottom with a fork.
  2. Chill for 20 minutes.
  3. Preheat the oven to 180c (fan)
  4. Cover the pastry with another layer of baking parchment and baking beans or rice and bake blind for 15 minutes.
  5. Remove the paper and beans and return to the oven for 10 minutes.
  6. Meanwhile, warm the butter, chestnut cream, cream and rum in a saucepan over low heat, stirring until well integrated, but not hot.
  7. Beat the eggs lightly then stir into the mixture.
  8. Add the chopped walnuts, reserving some halves for decoration, and mix together.
  9. Pour the mixture into the pastry case and decorate with the figs and walnut halves.
  10. Baked for 40 minutes until golden brown.
  11. Leave to cool and serve with creme fraiche, fromage blanc or ice cream.
Notes
  1. You can buy sweetened chestnut cream in tubes or cans. Alternatively, you may find the unsweetened variety, in which case you could add honey or maple syrup to taste.
beta
calories
303
fat
24g
protein
5g
carbs
18g
more
Focus on Flavour http://www.focusonflavour.com/

Smoked Haddock and Cauliflower Gratin – 350 calories

Smoked Haddock and Cauliflower GratinWe really enjoy tasty smoked haddock on a fast day, but were getting just a tad bored with the same old simple wilted spinach, smoked haddock and poached egg that we have had so often.

IMG_1810IMG_1815So I looked online for some inspiration and found an interesting recipe on BBC Good Food, from which I developed this fast day friendly version.  Using cauliflower on top of the spinach and fish turns this into a complete meal.

Choosing a strongly flavoured cheese like parmesan means that you can use a lot less but get a fantastic flavour. 

This got the thumbs up from us both and I will definitely be making it again!

For a vegetarian version, you could use smoked tofu, which would have a similar balance of flavours. But I also think that it would be lovely with a couple of big mushrooms each and maybe some chopped walnuts in the topping and some extra cheese. 

 

 

 

Smoked Haddock and Cauliflower Gratin
Serves 2
A fast day friendly fish gratin! Totally delicious and satisfying, a one-dish meal. the cauliflower makes an excellent alternative to potatoes.
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
45 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
45 min
350 calories
44 g
71 g
7 g
33 g
3 g
788 g
632 g
25 g
0 g
3 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
788g
Servings
2
Amount Per Serving
Calories 350
Calories from Fat 61
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 7g
11%
Saturated Fat 3g
17%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 2g
Cholesterol 71mg
24%
Sodium 632mg
26%
Total Carbohydrates 44g
15%
Dietary Fiber 10g
40%
Sugars 25g
Protein 33g
Vitamin A
207%
Vitamin C
310%
Calcium
39%
Iron
27%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 200g leaf spinach
  2. 2g butter (a trace)
  3. 170g smoked haddock, skinned and cut into 2 portions
  4. 1 large tomato, cut into 8 wedges
  5. ¼ cauliflower, cut into florets
For the topping
  1. 100ml creme fraiche
  2. juice ½ lemon
  3. 20g parmesan cheese, freshly grated
  4. ½ red onion, finely sliced
  5. a pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
  6. 1 tbsp dried breadcrumbs
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 180c Fan.
  2. Lightly grease a shallow oven proof dish.
  3. Put the cauliflower florets in a saucepan of boiling water to cover and simmer until just tender.
  4. Put the spinach in a colander and gently pour over hot water from a kettle to wilt it.
  5. Freshen under cold water and then squeeze out as much water as possible.
  6. Roughly chop the spinach and spread over the bottom of the oven dish.
  7. Lay the haddock fillets over the top and tuck the tomato pieces around them.
  8. Drain the cauliflower florets and distribute evenly over the top.
  9. Season well with black pepper.
  10. Mix together the cream, lemon juice, parmesan and onion with some freshly grated nutmeg.
  11. Spread over the top of the cauliflower.
  12. Sprinkle with breadcrumbs.
  13. Bake in the oven for about 30 minutes until the topping starts to turn golden.
  14. Serve at once.
Adapted from BBC Good Food
beta
calories
350
fat
7g
protein
33g
carbs
44g
more
Adapted from BBC Good Food
Focus on Flavour http://www.focusonflavour.com/